About Me

In no particular order, I’m a native of Boise, ID, the fourth of six kids, a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and an economics major at Utah State University.

When I tell people that I plan to get a PhD and become an economist, they generally look at me like a plate of pasta that smells of pavement instead of parmesan. I can’t help it, though–I love economics.

I didn’t always know I wanted to study it formally, of course. I had a fantastic economics teacher in high school, and her influence ignited my love of the subject, but I was resistant for a long time to the idea of studying it in college. I was concerned that it would become a chore.

I didn’t know what I wanted to study, though, so college took a backseat for a few years. Instead, I entered the workforce.

By age 26, I had a handful of elective credits I’d earned sporadically in the eight years since high school, and no earthly idea what I wanted to do with my life. I was beginning to feel like I was spinning my wheels in life.

I narrowed my interests to two majors: computer science and economics. They were both comparatively lucrative fields, and they were accessible online. But I couldn’t decide. Eventually, I put the matter to prayer, and I soon felt prompted to study economics.

This came as a surprise to absolutely no one.

See, in the eight years between high school econ class and when I finally settled on economics as a field of study, I’d read dozens of books, articles, studies, and blog posts by numerous authors and organizations on a range of topics within economics, and I spent countless hours (fruitlessly) debating economic matters on Facebook and Twitter. Virtually every conversation I had with family members and friends was at least obliquely related to economics.

So, when I decided economics was formally my future, a few dozen people set loose their collective breath, and I drowned in a tidal wave of “duh.”

And that brings me to now. I’m about three-fourths through my undergrad. I hope to attend graduate school at George Mason University.